opportunities

We seek the best and most enthusiastic graduate candidates from across the globe. Research topics are in the general area of experimental fluid mechanics, with a particular focus on turbulence, and will use a wide array of experimental methods to study the physics of such flows. Applicants will be expected to gain extensive knowledge in advanced laser based diagnostics and experimental techniques. Exceptional candidates will also be expected to couple their research with direct numerical simulations using the code InCompact3d or similar commercial software.

Prospective PhD applicants must already hold a Masters degree (M.Eng., M.Sc., M.Res. or equivalent) in Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace (Aeronautics) Engineering, Physics or Maths and have an excellent academic record (CGPA of 3.7 or above / 1st Class Degree). Other degrees are assessed on an individual basis. Prospective Master's applicants must also hold a relevant Engineering or Physics degree with a CGPA of 3.7 or above / 1st Class Degree.

Interested applicants must first submit an application to the McGill admission page and list Prof. Jovan Nedić as the potential supervising academic. You are strongly advised to tailor your Personal Statement to one of the available research projects (see below). Once the application is submitted, you may contact Prof. Jovan Nedić directly at jovan.nedic@mcgill.ca to discuss the project and application further.

We are currently seeking applicants for the following project(s):


AVAILABLE TO CURRENT MCGILL STUDENTS ONLY
This short term project is available to McGill Non-Thesis students. The applicant will perform aerodynamic measurements of lift, drag and moments in the wind tunnel on wing models that have been exposed to icy conditions. The main aim of this short project is to characterize the effects of ice accumulation on aerodynamic performance.

Interested students should contact Prof. Nedic directly


AVAILABLE TO CURRENT MCGILL STUDENTS ONLY
A student is required to conduct novel measurements on high-speed imploding cavities. The project is done in collaboration with Prof. Higgins. The successful candidate will study the effects of honeycomb geometry and initial liquid shell offsets on the steadiness of the imploding cavity interface. Interested applicants should contact Prof. Nedic for more information.

Interested students should contact Prof. Nedic directly


AVAILABLE TO CURRENT MCGILL STUDENTS ONLY
A Masters Non-Thesis student is sought to conduct measurements on a novel wind sensor being developed. The student will be required to conduct wind tunnel testing and develop a simple calibration matrix for the designed sensor.

Interested students should contact Prof. Nedic directly


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